Twenty-second edition of the N&O column / Spooks newsletter

(Date: Sun, 30 Jan 2000 01:49:43 +0100)

1999 Clandestine activity report | Morse stations | Voice stations | Intelligence news | Logs
Index | NS NL Home


Morse stations

Unid station

I copied an unid station on 14 Jan. at 2031 UTC on 2507.5 kHz using CW. The station transmitted 9 figure groups with short zeros. Each group started with a '8'. Most groups started with either 84 or 87. The CW was very fast and hand keyed. I passed the frequency a couple of minutes earlier and heard nothing. I assume that the transmission started at 2030 UTC. It ended at 2032 UTC. The station was apparently waiting for a response and after a minute or so it transmitted 'for ... (garbled) rpt'. After that nothing was heard.

Clues anyone?

Slovak military

Artho Wildhaber logged the Slovak military again on 4397 kHz in CW with
F6X2 F6X2 F6X2 = T4FD T4FD T4FD +
and
HXVH HXVH HXVH = NVKL NVKL NVKL +

See also Newsletter 23 for more about East European military stations.

Morse stations FAQ

Guy Denman updated his Morse stations FAQ. I included some of the info in this column. You can download your copy of the FAQ from the N&O home page.

And will be uploaded in HTML format on this site anytime soon (as a matter of fact: time permitting).

M10E

There is some doubt as to whether this station should be listed as M10E. M10 is Czech and M10E is Slovak. Has regular daily skeds and also a 4 week sked, Thursday to the following Tuesday 0900 (was 1000) on 5020 next transmission should start on Thursday 10 February 2000.

Call is 111x3 nnnnnx3 nnx3. Uses 5 Figure IDs and sends Gc 3 times. Is the morse station of S10E, 'the Slovak man'. Present frequency 5019 but has also used 5705.

Daily skeds as of January 2000: Daily 1655, on 11064. 2100 on ????. Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 0700 on 8116, 1400 on 10048. These all change frequency every new month. These M10E messages are always 20 groups

See also Newsletter 23.

M17 down the drain?? *** REPORTS WANTED ***

The last known sked of wednesday at 2000 UTC has not been heard since 29 December 1999, so it seems M17 has ended. If anyone has heard M17 since then, reports would be appreciated. Only known frequencies are 3410, 3910, 4270, 4461, 4740, 5235, 5695, 5865, 6290, 6675, 6935, 7425, 7990, 8070, 9050, 9425, and 10470 kHz.

See also Newsletter 30.

M29

The daily transmission at 1800 and 2000 UTC has changed to Tuesday, Friday, and Saturday. The same message is now transmitted for the month. Changes frequency each month, but is using the same freqs as last year.

The morning transmission at 0700 and 0730 UTC, is on Tuesday only. At present, January 2000, on 5610 and 5710 kHz, but changes each month. Same message sent for one month.

Guy further reports that he has heard M29 on Monday 17 January. It is uncertain if this will be a regular one but it certainly looks this way as it was heard again on 24 Jan. with a different message. The frequencies of the Monday transmissions were different to the Tuesday transmission, as was the message. Guy first heard them on 10620 kHz but that was a harmonic. It was on at 0700 UTC on 5311 kHz and 0730 UTC on 5411 kHz. Repeated at 1300 and 1330 UTC.

Especially interesting is Guy's following note: "Hans-Friedrich has mentioned that G04 has changed the encryption method, I copied the message and it seems M29 has done the same, as you can see there is no figure 9 in the message."

Usual VDE call
12 12 36 36 17 17 0800 0800 =
57655 50558 80287 55466 47537 42516 20064 76741 11256 40460
16362 45158 85775 08746 15382 58005 52086 50032 25555 01405
43537 84682 33202 14260 80122 10532 86185 02658 28224 42705
15867 74121 20451 26434 78817 04641 +

The Tuesday morning transmission (18 Jan) was different from the Monday transmission. Same times on 5610 and 5710 kHz.

Usual VDE Call
71 71 27 27 4 4 0800 0800 = =
67163 00126 34810 62404 00627 55346 02037 40773 42328 46451
06762 38328 46570 10424 77013 26546 61511 24127 87651 52807
82288 70170 31018 84382 54322 44453 02804 +

The evening transmission at 2000 UTC on 4420 kHz was as follows; the one at 1800 UTC was not heard.

Usual VDE Call
67 67 25 25 1 1 1900 1900 = =
88544 45321 11372 85444 05466 00643 86614 35800 82483 42752
78068 03878 65432 45401 72518 21458 17051 73734 71267 14171
62216 53116 78207 08433 73360 +

As you can see the figure 9 still doesn't appear in the messages.

See also Newsletter 23.

M39

Part of the M10 group but does not use M10 frequencies and can be on at any time. The length of the transmission varies and may include more than 1 ID.

Format:
458 458 458 76621 76621 Repeated 4 times
Period of dashes
458 458 458 73309 73309 Repeated 4 times

No ending, just stops after the last set of dashes.

See also Newsletter 45.

M44

Continuous Roman Letters. More info badly needed!!!

See also Newsletter 41 for more about M40.

M45

Similar format to M1 but is sent much slower at 12 WPM. Is part of the S21 family as the same message is sent to a different ID by the S21 Voice station. It used to start every message with 5 zeros, but has just recently stopped doing that. Transmits at 1802 each Tuesday and Thursday. At present on 3525 // 4025 kHz to ID 525, but that is liable to change. Now sends IDs made up of last 3 figures of lowest parallel frequency. It always starts at 2 minutes past the hour. Possible frequencies and IDs:

January February 3525 // 4025 525  
March April 4555 // 4955 555  

May to August

5074 // 5474 74 On at 1702
September October 4555 // 4955 555  
November December 3525 // 4025 525  
See also Newsletter 129.

M52

2 Figure 6 Figure. Another station that may be on at any time. Again when it is on can be on for days continuously. Heard on 5 November 1998 on 4802 kHz.

Format:
2000 11 II 253257 253257 253257 AR
2015 12 II 254987 254987 254987 II 99 AR

Latest log Friday 19 February 1999, 1900 to 2100, on 4801 sending 24 II 854957 854957 894957 AR

Logged again on 28 July 1999 on 5694 36 II 511919 511919 511919 II 29 II 222 AR

See also Newsletter 30.

M76 - Station profile

Guy Denman wrote the following profile. Great stuff; thanks! Guy is still the only one who regularly reports this station. It would be nice if we could get some more info and/or logs. Anyone?!?!?

M76 is a new station I have found on 11 December 1998. Is on at 0500 and 1750 it then repeats same message. Present frequency is 3819 but it does move lower in the Summer. Other frequencies noted are 3280 and 3293. Uses the same callsigns twice, but not on the same day. 1750 and 0500 the next day. Uses a different callsign each day, they can be a mixture of letters and figures. It does use accented letters in the callsign. So far noted U ..-- and A .-.-

- Sample Preamble, having all the letters in it.
IEVF DE 2u7D QTC 10 29 = 26310 15151 16x5f groups 6144X RRRRR 20236
9247X WWWWW 71352 74974 546XX DDDDD 51551 60952 44458 NNNNN =

- Sample preamble just using R W & N
WJ1u DE 4RIW QTC 12 26 = 26310 051
60 15x5f 63614 RRRRR 206XX WWWWW
73853 77395 32740 3818X NNNNN =

- Sample messages
205 8 = 40545 79509 25505 93311 99399 39092 30844 8437X

- This message was first sent on 1999-11-22, and is still being sent on 1999-12-26
330 12 = 40545 79639 30505 93113 99399 39092 69361 4x5f 48437
333 10 = 40545 79639 33505 93813 19399 39092 32240 54579 63933 437XX
335 21 = 40545 79639 35505 94313 19399 39092 69002 12x5f 54484 37XXX
337 8 = 40545 79639 37505 94913 19399 39092 69544 9437X

You can see from these samples how the first groups have similarities. The first group of all messages is always 40545. As you can see the message always ends with 437.

Format:
IEVF DE 2u7D QTC 10 29 = 26310 15151 16x5f groups 6144X RRRRR 20236
9247X WWWWW 71352 74974 546XX DDDDD 51551 60952 44458 NNNNN =
IEVF (call 4 char. sent 3x) DE 2u7D ('de' + 4 char. call sent twice)
QTC 96 23 (QTC 96 is a serial number, next transmission day will be QTC 97. 23 is a group count). QTC goes up to 99 then starts at 01 again.

First part of preamble always starts 26310, and quite often has groups of 5 letters, heard so far are D R W and N Last group is always NNNNN. This first part, apart from the first group is always different. The group following RRRRR is usually 20*XX, then WWWWW but recently there have been some 2x5f Groups after this, as in the sample above.

Then follow several messages which can be repeated for days, sent as 335 33 = 33x5f = Last group usually contains some letter X. I take it that the messages keep on being sent until the recipient acknowledges the receipt of the message. The first six groups of the messages have similarities. The first group is always 40545 and the second starts with 7. The last two figures of the message are always 437. where the last group is 7XXXX, then the previous group will end with a 43.

The message is sent fairly fast at about 25 WPM. Not a very good signal in Southern England, but even worse in Holland. I have not heard it from April 1999, until November 1999, as the path is all in daylight, and signals do not travel at that lower frequency. It was logged in Europe during the Summer Months. Here are a number of logs monitored during December. The small letters are the accented letters used a .-.- and u ..--

Day UTC freq preamble + message(s)
3 1750 3819 HNID DE KaWN QTC 84 35 = 330/12 205/8
4 0500 3819 HNID DE KaWN QTC 85 20 = 330/12 205/8
5 1750 3819 V5P4 DE I6R6 QTC 86 33 = 330/12 205/8
6 0500 3819 V5P4 DE I6R6 QTC 87 33 = 330/12 205/8
7 0500 3819 8MLI DE W46a QTC 89 30 = 330/12 205/8
7 1750 3819 R9SK DE KLCC QTC 90 ?? = 331/8 330/12 205/8
8 1750 3819 6Q2L DE CGBS QTC 92 28 = 333/10 331/8 330/12 205/8
9 0500 3819 6Q2L DE CGBS QTC 93 29 = 331/8 330/12 205/8
10 0500 3819 E657 DE DA88 QTC 95 25 = 331/8 330/12 205/8
10 1750 3819 146A DE BHuZ QTC 96 26 = 331/8 330/12 205/8
11 0500 3819 146A DE BHuZ QTC 97 28 = 334/11 331/8 205/8
11 1750 3819 PLQT DE N3UH QTC 98 32 = 331/8 205/8
12 0500 3819 PLQT DE N3UH QTC 99 29 = 331/8 205/8
13 0500 3819 3G4Y DE FEOU QTC 02 29 = 331/8 205/8
13 1750 3819 7ATN DE GJY9 QTC 03 32 = 335/21 331/8 205/8
14 0500 3819 7ATN DE GJY9 QTC 04 31 = 335/21 331/8 205/8
14 1750 3819 MHNV DE Q2FE QTC 05 31 = 335/21 331/8 205/8
15 0500 3819 MHNV DE Q2FE QTC 06 21 = 335/21 331/8 205/8
15 1750 3819 a39B DE 01JR QTC 07 21 = 335/21 331/8 205/8
16 0500 3819 a39B DE 01JR QTC 08 28 = 336/10 335/21 331/8 205/8
16 1750 3819 IEVF DE 2u7D QTC 09 32 = 335/21 205/8
17 0500 3819 IEVF DE 2u7D QTC 10 29 = 335/21 205/8
17 1750 3819 WJ1u DE 4RI4 QTC 11 31 = 335/21 205/8
18 1750 3819 K2K3 DE 9IPI QTC 13 27 = 335/21 205/8
19 0500 3819 K2K3 DE 9IPI QTC 14 26 = 335/21 205/8
20 0500 3819 C13W DE SSLK QTC 16 39 = 337/8 335/21 205/8
21 0500 3819 Dua1 DE LDSL QTC 18 31 = 337/8 335/21 205/8
21 1750 3819 BRMG DE JP27 QTC 19 30 = 337/8 335/21 205/8
22 0500 3819 BRMG DE JP27 QTC 20 19 = 337/8 335/21 205/8
23 0500 3819 NIAJ DE YPHA QTC 22 28 = 337/8 335/21 205/8
23 1750 3819 FSHP DE AVGT QTC 23 35 = 337/8 335/21 205/8
24 0500 3819 FSHP DE AVGT QTC 24 21 = 337/8 335/21 205/8
24 1750 3819 GDDQ DE 4UQY QTC 25 26 = 337/8 335/21 205/8
25 0500 3819 GDDQ DE 4UQY QTC 26 34 = 337/8 335/21 205/8
25 1750 3819 QFEO DE TY4N QTC 27 = 338/30 337/8 335/21 205/8
See also Newsletter 23.

M51 profile

researched and written by Valeriano Martin and translated by an old friend. EXCELLENT work guys!

M51 is a station supposedly linked to French Military Intelligence and operates from close to Paris. The first intercepts registered from this transmitter date from June 1996, and probably not much before this was the beginning of its existence, considering how improbable it'd be for such long transmissions to escape the European Utility scene undetected.

M51's services begin every Monday at dawn and stay on the air until Friday evening. They consist of an interminable succession of messages numbered from 01-90, each one being composed of 100 5-letter groups. Each message is preceded by a header like this:
BT NR 38 N 30 08:13:28 1999
which consists of the following information:

NR 38 message number, it is a one-up number from 01-90, which returns to the beginning again
N first letter of the month in French
30 date
08:13:28 Central European Time (UTC+2 Summer, UTC+1 in Winter)
Sometimes, it lags real time by a few minutes.
1999 year
Months in French are: janvier, février, mars, avril, mai, juin, juillet, août, septembre, octobre, novembre and décembre. As you can see, the first letter of each of these is exactly the same as the first letter of the month name in many other Western European languages.

It alternates between 6 pairs of frequencies that change every week, although this transmission has been observed staying on the same frequencies for up to four weeks at a time. Three pairs of frequencies are usually utilized for most of the daytime (from +/- 0530-1530 UTC), and the other three for the rest of the day.

The following table covers the intercepts during weeks 22-49 divided by week period, and then each 3 pairs of AM and PM frequencies (A,B,C) Information about the missing frequencies is much appreciated.

 

Morning frequencies

Week A A B B C C
49   3 846 3 672   4 473 5 455
48 3 608 4 825 3 820   5 424  
47 3 162   4 970   6 787  
46 4 481   5 129 5 740   7 340
45   4 024 6 839 5 018 8 015 7 390
44 3 687         6 940
43 3 692 5 149 4 495 5 869 6 925 6 963
42 3 692 5 149 4 495 5 869 6 925 6 963
41 3 670 5 067 4 440 5 455 6 886  
40   5 193   5 907 7 330  
39 3 800 4 447     7 420 5 243
38 4 628 5 190 5 320 5 905    
37 3 757 5 224   5 907   7 340
36   5 223   5 905   7 340
35 8 043 5 224   5 907 6 984 5 787
34 3 800   5 318     5 377
33 2 381 4 024 2 712   5 740  
32 3 730 5 223   5 907   7 340
31 3 730 5 223   5 907   7 340
30 3 730 5 223   5 907   7 340
29 3 730 5 223   5 907   7 340
28         6 981 6 950
27            
26           5 124
25   5 425 5 838   5 892  
24   5 425 5 838 5 892    
23   5 425 5 838 5 892    
22   5 425 5 838 5 892    

Afternoon frequencies

Week A A B B C C
49 5 277   5 908 6 839    
48 2 396 3 687 5 142 5 427 5 443  
47           7 330
46 10 651 11 615 5 130 3 670 6 925 6 787
45   3 866 5 277 3 710 5 798  
44 2 548 3 957 5 318 6 889 6 975  
43 2 550 3 959 5 320 6 941   7 318
42 2 550 3 959 5 320 6 941   7 318
41   3 844 5 268 5 930    
40   4 483 5 319     7 364
39 5 243 3 771   6 984    
38   3 800        
37 2 567 4 039 5 336 6 984   7 388
36   4 031 5 335 6 981   7 374
35   3 757 4 598    
34 2 548 4 447       7 938
33 2 291   5 320 3 771    
32 2 563 4 025 5 337 6 984   7 388
31 2 563 4 025 5 337 6 984   7 388
30 2 563 4 025 5 337 6 984   7 388
29 2 563 4 025 5 337 6 984   7 388
28   4 024 5 193 3 745   7 361
27     5 190 3 708 6 975  
26 2 550 3 882 5 279 6 839    
25   3 824 5 226 5 870 5 908  
24   3 824 5 226 5 870 5 908  
23   3 824 5 226 5 870 5 908  
22   3 824 5 226 5 870 5 908  



The preference shown by M51 for the 2-8 MHz bands doesn't seem to always have been the case. There are intercepts of this transmission in the 16m band. The highest frequency intercepted was 11615 kHz.

Frequency assignment in each hour block seems to follow some well-established rules; but I don't have enough intercepts (especial in daytime hours) to discover the regularities between the numerous exceptions that are observed. In general, it can be said that, each hour block (AM/PM), there are three schedules with different transmissions. In this manner, in one day, all 6 available frequencies are utilized. The next day, each pair of frequencies jumps ahead one schedule in its hour block, with the exception of the frequency that occupied the first schedule position, which naturally falls to the last position.

The following table follows with weekly programming: footnotes reveal that each color represents the frequency pairs, and that grey represents periods of inactivity.

M51 Programmacion semanal

Times expressed above are in Central European Time (UTC+1/UTC+2). Those of you, if any, using a text only browser should click here.

The schedules indicated in the previous table seem to vary without an apparent pattern. It is not only that frequency changeovers can jump ahead or fall behind with regard to the indicated time, but that a schedule can be prolonged for hours and hours beyond the foreseen limit, almost as if someone had forgotten to change to the appropriate frequency. This is a circumstance requiring further study, as it is, in fact, a scheme of transmissions that occur during the central hours of the day, submerged, for me, in a nebulous cloud of abysmal reception. For all that, the information contained in this table is still subject to corrections, and should be considered orientational, especially for the period between the hours of 0930-1930 UTC.

When a frequency change occurs, the transmission starts again in the exact place it left off at. This fact, which has been seen over and over again in frequency changes without interruption, has not been confirmed for those other transmissions in which a time lapse of no transmissions between schedules has occurred (like between 0930-1100 or 1530-1630 UTC. Limited though I am in ability to follow daytime transmissions, I was able to indirectly compare and analyze transmitted message serial numbers. These are transmitted with fair regularity at a rate of about 10 per hour (374.3 seconds per message if you want a more precise approximation), which permits the linking of a relationship between the message serial numbers and the number of messages sent, and the time necessary to do it.

We can suppose that on a given day, there are two intercepts of M51, one at 1000 AM and the other at 1900 PM. In the nine hours lapsed between both intercepts, some 87 messages of 374.3 second duration can fit. Accordingly, if the transmitter was operating without interruption during all this time between intercepts, the message header of the message transmitted in the PM will have been 87 higher in message serial number than that transmitted in the AM. On the contrary, if transmission occurred without interruption anytime during the day, and later continued at the point in which it left off, it would be seen in this second intercept a gap that corresponds to this pause in time. Returning to the example, if the transmitter had stopped operating for an hour, the second intercept wouldn't have been 87 message serial numbers higher, but 10 message serial numbers lower, or 77. So, there were 10 messages that were not transmitted during that hour of interruption. The same reasoning can be extended to longer periods of time, with intercepts more widely separated in time, with the resultant added indetermination with respect to the number of complete cycles of 90 messages that occurred between intercepts.

Statistical analysis of available intercepts demonstrates that there is a daily loss of about an hour, but that it is slightly different for each day of the week: the greatest on Monday and Wednesday; and the least on Thursday. Week after week, this same pattern is repeated with almost identical figures.

The following table shows the daily deficit of transmission hours deduced from analyzing message headers, and are separated by number of messages and hours.

  Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri(AM) Fri(PM+Sat/Sun)
Messages 12900 9500 11400 8300 5100 594900
Hours 01:20:00 00:59:00 01:11:00 00:51:00 00:32:00 62:47:00

Irregardless, the periods of interruption shown in the schedule table total up to no less than two hours per day. Does this mean that there is an as yet undetected daytime transmission? It is a distinct possibility, but it would be difficult to prove without evidence, though one could let oneself be persuaded by the mere statistical evidence.

To try to throw more light on the subject, it is necessary to go back to the last week of October 1998. At that time, the clock that controlled transmission was out of adjustment, probably caused by the shift to Winter time. As a consequence of this mistake, the time sent in the message headers did not correspond to local time. On the morning of the 26th, normal transmissions were occurring on 6940 kHz and 6963 kHz, but the time transmitted in the message header was two hours ahead of local time. Until 0800 UTC, (0900 local time, 1100 transmitted time), an unexpected morse lesson was transmitted on the frequencies by callsign FAV22.

See what was written by that time in Newsletter 9.

FAV22 is a French Army transmitter in the service of the French Amateur Radio Union for teaching morse. Each week, a daily lesson is offered at 1100 local time [1000 UTC], and is repeated in the afternoon at 1545 UTC. Both are simultaneously transmitted in parallel on 3881 and 6825 kHz and last approximately a half-hour. Supplemental lessons are transmitted on Sunday mornings. That FAV22 appeared unexpectedly on frequencies occupied by the M51 transmission makes one think there is a link between both stations, an impression that is strengthened by the observation of the incorrectly set control clock used to time the morse lesson. In my opinion, that revealing incident demonstrated the automation of both transmitters was done by the same equipment. On this point, one can go back and see that the FAV22 morse lessons only occur during those periods when the M51 transmission is inactive: the two daily gaps or during the weekend.

Each FAV22 morse session consists of four lessons daily: the 1st and 3rd, with characteristic 5-figure or 5-letter groups, while the other two are clear French plaintexts that include accented characters. Transmission speed goes up as the week goes on, reaching 960 characters per minute on Fridays. The length of these lessons also varies with ability level, and considering these two factors together, gives the characteristic of having the same type of session on each day of the week. After timing the FAV22 transmissions for more than a month, I've obtained the following averages:

The following table shows lesson duration divided by weekdays and separated by individual lesson and total lesson time. The table includes a call-up of 278 seconds' duration, which is the same for each day of the week.

  Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri
Individual session 00:39:26 00:28:43 00:35:02 00:25:03 00:32:09
Total sessions 01:18:52 00:57:27 01:10:05 00:50:07 01:04:18



Later, there exists a perfect correlation between the deficit observed in the M51 transmission and that of the morse lessons. (Compare for yourselves the two tables) Is there a need for more indications that the two transmitters share the same installation and transmission time? For he who still doubts it, I recommend tuning up to 6825 kHz at 0930 or 1530 UTC (one hour less in Summer) at just the moment when M51 ends its transmission on its usual frequencies. With almost complete certainty, one can still hear some groups being sent by the M51 transmission just minutes before VVV DE FAV22 appears on the frequency.

The weekly programming table now includes both M51 and FAV22.

 

 

Times expressed above are in Central European Time (UTC+1/UTC+2). Those of you, if any, using a text only browser should click here.

 

The periods of inactivity that precede and follow each FAV22 lesson remain unexplained, and don't leave a trail (clue) - and this is the hallmark - in the sequence of messages from the M51 transmission, it is as if the transmission had continued during those minutes. It does not seem probable that that there is an as yet undetected transmission, given that the changeover to the FAV22 transmissions is so perceptible, as has just been indicated. We'll have to think, then, that the succession of messages continues internally, without going on the air, or that the restart of M51 transmissions is accounted for in the pause in order to (correctly) calculate the corresponding numbering.

According the the pages of the French Radio Amateur Union, control of FAV22 is done by the Center for Control of Northern Frequencies by the French Army Fort at Kremlin-Bicêtre, on the periphery of Paris, and that the transmitter, of 1 KW, is located in Vernon, 65 km to the northwest. These same installations, according to the aforementioned source, are those utilized each Thursday (not on Sundays anymore since January 1999) as a platform for morse exercises that comes from the collaboration between the French Army and Radio Amateurs' Union, in this case, the F9TM network. But, while the FAV22 morse lessons are on the air while M51 is inactive, the F9TM Thursday lessons take place at 1900 UTC during the M51 activity. There are few and insufficient data to confirm this with total confidence, but I believe I have observed that M51 momentarily abandons its second parallel frequency during execution of the F9TM lessons.

The Center for Control of Northern Frequencies has recently confirmed an intercept of mine of the M51 transmission. On the QSL card, I was informed that the transmissions come on the air from Favières, about 80 km to the southeast of Paris. This report doesn't only contradict my hypothesis about Vernon, but also that of radio direction-finding equipment, which locates the transmitter just north of the capital. I'd bet that both theories were based on obsolete data. [note: earlier df's from Germany and Holland confirm Favières, Valeriano -Ary- ]

See also Newsletter 23.

M8 schedules

M8 schedules sorted by time/freq updated: 1/1/2000
maintained by Bob Roehrig.

ZULU KHZ M T W T F S S
0100 4506       X      
0200 4016       X      
0200 5116         X    
0200 5419 X         X  
0200 5758             X
0200 7887             X
0200 10714   X          
0300 4016           X  
0300 4028   X X   X   X
0300 4506     X       X
0300 5419       X      
0300 5758         X    
0400 3244             X
0400 4034           X  
0400 9330 X            
0400 10125           X  
0400 10235   X         X
0500 9062             X
0500 9330           X  
0600 9153   X          
0700 3150 X            
0700 9064             X
0700 9153       X X    
0800 8095     X        
0800 10237             X
0900 9153 X            
0900 9238 X   X        
1000 9153 X       X    
1000 9333     X        
1100 4025           X  
1100 4173             X
1100 4478           X  
1100 8136           X  
1100 9238             X
1100 10346           X  
1100 10448   X   X      
1200 6767             X
1200 6797 X   X   X X X
1200 6866         X    
1200 6933           X  
1200 6982 X            
1200 6982 X            
1200 7890   X          
1200 9152           X  
1300 6767       X      
1300 6786             X
1300 6854       X      
1300 6866           X  
1300 6932   X       X  
1300 6982 X           X
1300 7320         X    
1300 7890       X   X  
1300 10566         X    
1400 7890           X X
See also Newsletter 23.

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